Delta Center assists in music video production

Manu Lanvin in Kossman’s 1972 LeMans convertible at historic Dockery Farms, known around the world as the birthplace of the Blues.

Manu Lanvin in Kossman’s 1972 LeMans convertible at historic Dockery Farms, known around the world as the birthplace of the Blues.

The Delta Center for Culture and Learning at Delta State University recently helped French Blues singer Manu Lanvin film a music video for his latest release "Sur la route sixty one" ( On Highway 61).  Manu (who goes by his first name) and his producer/photographer, Alexandre Villeret, spent over a week filming in the Delta.  Highlights of their visit included an evening of live Blues at historic Po’ Monkey’s Lounge, during which Manu performed with Mississippi’s own Terry “Harmonica” Bean.  Bean has recently toured in France, and also been featured in the French Blues Magazine called “Blues” as well as in Living Blues Magazine.   Kossman’s automotive, in Cleveland, provided access to their 1972 LeMans convertible, which appears in the music video.

Print Friendly and PDF

Delta Center hosts workshop in Memphis

  Participants in The Delta Center for Culture and Learning workshop gather for a photo while touring Memphis.

 

Participants in The Delta Center for Culture and Learning workshop gather for a photo while touring Memphis.

The Delta State University Delta Center for Culture and Learning recently took its workshop “The Most Southern Place on Earth:  History, music and culture of the Mississippi Delta” to Memphis.

The workshop is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Participants in the workshop were teachers (K-12) and librarians, and they came from 21 states.  They were in the Delta for seven days, and several stayed for an extra day or two before going home. 

While in Memphis, the workshop participants visited the Cotton Museum, the Stax Museum of American Soul Music, and the National Civil Rights Museum, before going to the Peabody Hotel to watch the famous ducks walk from the fountain to the elevators.

Print Friendly and PDF

The Delta Center for Culture and Learning and the Robertson Scholars tour Memphis

Robertson Scholars at the Stax Musuem of American Soul Music.

Robertson Scholars at the Stax Musuem of American Soul Music.

The Delta Center for Culture and Learning at Delta State University recently took ten Robertson Scholars to Memphis.  While there, they visited the Stax Museum of American Soul Music, Graceland, and the National Civil Rights Museum.  They also saw Beale Street and watched the ducks march in the lobby of the Peabody Hotel. 

The scholars group included six scholars who are living in Cleveland for the summer plus three who are living in New Orleans and one stationed in Atlanta.  The tour was escorted by the Delta Center’s Lee Aylward.  The Delta Center is currently the manager of the Mississippi Delta National Heritage Area.

Print Friendly and PDF

The Delta State University Delta Center for Culture and Learning recently review plans for Blues Museum and Visitor’s Center

L to R- Willie Bearden, museum consultant, Wanda Clark and Allan Hammons of Hammons and Associates, Mississippi Blues Trail designers, Luther Brown, Delta Center and MS Delta National Heritage Area, Mary Beth Wilkerson, MDA/Mississippi Tourism, and Scott Blake, museum consultant.

L to R- Willie Bearden, museum consultant, Wanda Clark and Allan Hammons of Hammons and Associates, Mississippi Blues Trail designers, Luther Brown, Delta Center and MS Delta National Heritage Area, Mary Beth Wilkerson, MDA/Mississippi Tourism, and Scott Blake, museum consultant.

The Delta State University Delta Center for Culture and Learning was recently invited to review plans for the new Gateway to the Blues Museum and Visitor’s Center located on Highway 61 in Tunica. The Delta Center was included because it is now the manager of the Mississippi Delta National Heritage Area. 

The visitor’s center is currently open, and the museum will be under construction soon, opening in 2014.  The new visitor’s center is adjacent to the previous one, but is now located in an old railroad terminal that was moved from Dundee.  The museum will house the fine collection of artifacts that was formerly on display in the Horseshoe Casino, and will direct visitors along the Mississippi Blues Trail.

Print Friendly and PDF